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20-Apr-2019 05:47

These reception rooms should he isolated from the interior of the convent, and the religious should not have free access to them.

Custom, however, allows the erection, at the entrance to the convent, of reception rooms to which women may be admitted.

The Congregation of Propaganda seems to have in this opinion its own, in decreeing that, in missionary countries, the law of cloister applies to the religious houses which belong to the mission, and which serve as a fixed dwelling for even two or three regular missionaries of the Latin Rite (Collectanea Propagandae Fidei, Replies of 26 Aug., 1780, and of 5 March, 1787, n. Strictly speaking, the whole enclosed space -- house and garden -- ought to be encloistered.

479) the houses where only two or three religious dwell permanently, and obseve their rule as they can, are subject to this law ; it is not necessary that the religious be in a number which secures them the privilege of exemption from the bishop's jurisdiction. On the other hand, the law of cloister does not apply to houses which are simply hired by religious, and which cannot therefore he looked upon as fixed and definitive homes, nor to the Villa-houses to which the religious go for recreation on fixed days or for a few weeks every year.

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If they are sent to follow a university course, they must reside in a religious house. Obstacle to the Entrance of Outsiders Women are strictly forbidden to enter the encloistered portions of a house of male religious. This excommunication is absolutely reserved to the Holy See ; it affects the women who enter as well as the superior or religious who admits them.(b) Female Material Clausura Those parts of the convent to which the nuns have access are all within the cloister, the choir not excepted. If the convent church be public, the nuns cannot go into those parts accessible to the people. The law is much more severe for female than for male houses; in fact, even women are rigorously excluded from the cloistered parts. Hence, in spite of the general terms of the law, it seems probable that the sister who should introduce a child under seven would not incur the ecclesistical censure.Further, the building should be so constructed that neither the sisters can look outside their enclosure, nor their neighbours see into the court-yards or gardens at the disposal of the sisters. restricting still more this law, recognized only three legitimate causes: fire, leprosy, and contagious malady. The penalty for those who enter and for those who admit or introduce them is the same -- an excommunication absolutely reserved to the Holy See ("Apost. This regime, however, admits of exceptions; corporal or spiritual needs demand the physician's or the confessor's presence, the garden must be cultivated, the building kept in repair. cit.), who maintains that when one has an evident reason for entering within the cloister, he avoids both the censure and the sin, even though he have only an oral permission.The bishop can and must punish the violators of this law of residence (Sess. The penalty always supposes, of course, a serious sin on the offender's part, but the moralists are very severe in their appreciation of cases.The fact of having just fully crossed the boundary suffices, according to them, for the commission of a serious sin and incurs the penalty.

If they are sent to follow a university course, they must reside in a religious house. Obstacle to the Entrance of Outsiders Women are strictly forbidden to enter the encloistered portions of a house of male religious. This excommunication is absolutely reserved to the Holy See ; it affects the women who enter as well as the superior or religious who admits them.(b) Female Material Clausura Those parts of the convent to which the nuns have access are all within the cloister, the choir not excepted. If the convent church be public, the nuns cannot go into those parts accessible to the people. The law is much more severe for female than for male houses; in fact, even women are rigorously excluded from the cloistered parts. Hence, in spite of the general terms of the law, it seems probable that the sister who should introduce a child under seven would not incur the ecclesistical censure.Further, the building should be so constructed that neither the sisters can look outside their enclosure, nor their neighbours see into the court-yards or gardens at the disposal of the sisters. restricting still more this law, recognized only three legitimate causes: fire, leprosy, and contagious malady. The penalty for those who enter and for those who admit or introduce them is the same -- an excommunication absolutely reserved to the Holy See ("Apost. This regime, however, admits of exceptions; corporal or spiritual needs demand the physician's or the confessor's presence, the garden must be cultivated, the building kept in repair. cit.), who maintains that when one has an evident reason for entering within the cloister, he avoids both the censure and the sin, even though he have only an oral permission.The bishop can and must punish the violators of this law of residence (Sess. The penalty always supposes, of course, a serious sin on the offender's part, but the moralists are very severe in their appreciation of cases.The fact of having just fully crossed the boundary suffices, according to them, for the commission of a serious sin and incurs the penalty.It consists in leaving the cloister without a good and serious motive, at a late hour, when people would be surprised to meet a religious outside his monastery.