Lomotil expiration dating

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American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 4500 East-West Highway, Suite 900, Bethesda, Maryland 20814. Nerve agents: tabun (GA) CAS 77-81-6; sarin (GB) CAS 107-44-8; soman (GD) CAS 96-64-0; and VX CAS 50782-69-9. † Use is not currently included in the labeling approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Infants, patients with Down’s syndrome (mongolism), and children with spastic paralysis or brain damage may be hypersensitive to antimuscarinic effects (e.g., mydriasis, positive chronotropic effect). Ellenhorn’s medical toxicology: diagnosis and treatment of human poisoning. Severity and frequency of adverse effects are dose related and individual intolerance varies greatly; adverse effects occasionally may be obviated by a reduction in dosage but this also may eliminate potential therapeutic effects. Exposed: signs, symptoms & EMS management of nerve-agent poisoning. (See Organophosphate Anticholinesterase Pesticides under Dosage.) Concomitant cholinesterase reactivator (pralidoxime chloride) therapy may not be necessary and atropine therapy generally is less prolonged (e.g., only 1 or 2 days) and symptoms usually do not recur once asymptomatic. (See Pediatric Patients: Pesticide Poisoning, under Dosage.) Carbamate poisoning is treated with the same doses of atropine sulfate as for organophosphate poisoning and IM self-administration can be employed when necessary. Atro Pen (atropine injection) prescribing information.

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WHO model prescribing information: Drugs used in anesthesia.

Frequent effects include xerostomia (dry mouth), dry skin, blurred vision, cycloplegia, mydriasis, photophobia, anhidrosis, urinary hesitancy and retention, tachycardia, palpitation, xerophthalmia, and constipation, Other common effects include increased ocular tension (especially in patients with angle-closure glaucoma), loss of taste, headache, nervousness, restlessness, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, flushing, insomnia, nausea, vomiting, bloated feeling, anhidrosis (especially in hot environments), Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Please refer to the ASHP Drug Shortages Resource Center for information on shortages of one or more of these preparations. © Copyright 2017, Selected Revisions April 24, 2017.

2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.

American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, O'Gara PT et al.

WHO model prescribing information: Drugs used in anesthesia.

Frequent effects include xerostomia (dry mouth), dry skin, blurred vision, cycloplegia, mydriasis, photophobia, anhidrosis, urinary hesitancy and retention, tachycardia, palpitation, xerophthalmia, and constipation, Other common effects include increased ocular tension (especially in patients with angle-closure glaucoma), loss of taste, headache, nervousness, restlessness, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, flushing, insomnia, nausea, vomiting, bloated feeling, anhidrosis (especially in hot environments), Excipients in commercially available drug preparations may have clinically important effects in some individuals; consult specific product labeling for details.

Please refer to the ASHP Drug Shortages Resource Center for information on shortages of one or more of these preparations. © Copyright 2017, Selected Revisions April 24, 2017.

2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines.

American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, O'Gara PT et al.

In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, usually starting at the low end of the dosing range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy.