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12-Jun-2019 02:45

No, she said, what the students say is not scripted, but someone from each class is expected to greet each visitor.

As if to prove her point, Swafford takes me to a nearby eighth-grade algebra class where Carrigan Collins, 13, repeats the exercise.

Later, toward the end of my visit, I ask to go back and take a closer look at the data.

Swafford says sure, points me in the right direction, and then heads off to a meeting, leaving me to go over the charts and figures.

Where other school leaders might be able to imagine some of the extracurriculars and support services the girls at CGLA have access to, few seem as adept at actually securing the funding to deliver them.

(Swafford is also the co-founder of an education consulting firm, so she’s not unfamiliar with the corporate world.) Twenty-nine percent of the school’s budget is from fundraising, she told me, which helps fill a ,500-per-student gap in funding.

With each grade, more magnets make their way toward “proficient” and beyond.On the day I visit, the class is discussing the 9/11 Falling Man photo.“I like challenging things,” Hawa Barrie, 13, tells me, explaining that there is a lot of homework, but that she feels like she is learning at the school.That’s true for public schools, private schools, co-ed schools, and single-sex schools. In other words, it doesn’t seem to be the all-girls factor or the charter designation that have propelled the school’s success.It’s Swafford’s leadership.* * *Sometimes when I visit schools, it’s painfully obvious that the picture being presented by administrators is far too positive to reflect reality. On an adjoining wall, hundreds of magnets bearing individual names track each girl’s proficiency in a range of subjects, from below basic to advanced.

With each grade, more magnets make their way toward “proficient” and beyond.On the day I visit, the class is discussing the 9/11 Falling Man photo.“I like challenging things,” Hawa Barrie, 13, tells me, explaining that there is a lot of homework, but that she feels like she is learning at the school.That’s true for public schools, private schools, co-ed schools, and single-sex schools. In other words, it doesn’t seem to be the all-girls factor or the charter designation that have propelled the school’s success.It’s Swafford’s leadership.* * *Sometimes when I visit schools, it’s painfully obvious that the picture being presented by administrators is far too positive to reflect reality. On an adjoining wall, hundreds of magnets bearing individual names track each girl’s proficiency in a range of subjects, from below basic to advanced.So beyond math and reading, she sees it as the school’s job to instill soft skills, like how to interact with visitors, for instance.